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Title: Radiofrequency stimulated and Silicic Acid Enhanced Hyperthermia Effectusing the Biodegradation of Porous Silicon Nanowires
Authors: Gongalsky, Maksim B.Gvindzhilia, GeorgeTamarov, K.P.Shalygina, OlgaPavlikov, AlexanderSolovyev, Valery V.Kudryavtsev, Andrew A.Sivakov, VladimirOsminkina, Liubov Andreevna
Publishers Version: https://doi.org/10.1021/acsomega.9b01030
Issue Date: 2019
Published in: ACS Omega 4 (2019), Nr. 6
Publisher: Washington : American Chemical Society
Abstract: The radiofrequency (RF) mild hyperthermia effect sensitized by biodegradable nanoparticles is a promising approach for therapy and diagnostics of numerous human diseases including cancer. Herein, we report the significant enhancement of local destruction of cancer cells induced by RF hyperthermia in the presence of degraded low-toxic porous silicon (PSi) nanowires (NWs). Proper selection of RF irradiation time (10 min), intensity, concentration of PSi NWs, and incubation time (24 h) decreased cell viability to 10%, which can be potentially used for cancer treatment. The incubation for 24 h is critical for degradation of PSi NWs and the formation of silicic acid ions H+ and H3SiO4– in abundance. The ions drastically change the solution conductivity in the vicinity of PSi NWs, which enhances the absorption of RF radiation and increases the hyperthermia effect. The high biodegradability and efficient photoluminescence of PSi NWs were governed by their mesoporous structure. The average size of pores was 10 nm, and the sizes of silicon nanocrystals (quantum dots) were 3–5 nm. Degradation of PSi NWs was observed as a significant decrease of optical absorbance, photoluminescence, and Raman signals of PSi NW suspensions after 24 h of incubation. Localization of PSi NWs at cell membranes revealed by confocal microscopy suggested that thermal poration of membranes could cause cell death. Thus, efficient photoluminescence in combination with RF-induced cell membrane breakdown indicates promising opportunities for theranostic applications of PSi NWs.The radiofrequency (RF) mild hyperthermia effect sensitized by biodegradable nanoparticles is a promising approach for therapy and diagnostics of numerous human diseases including cancer. Herein, we report the significant enhancement of local destruction of cancer cells induced by RF hyperthermia in the presence of degraded low-toxic porous silicon (PSi) nanowires (NWs). Proper selection of RF irradiation time (10 min), intensity, concentration of PSi NWs, and incubation time (24 h) decreased cell viability to 10%, which can be potentially used for cancer treatment. The incubation for 24 h is critical for degradation of PSi NWs and the formation of silicic acid ions H+ and H3SiO4– in abundance. The ions drastically change the solution conductivity in the vicinity of PSi NWs, which enhances the absorption of RF radiation and increases the hyperthermia effect. The high biodegradability and efficient photoluminescence of PSi NWs were governed by their mesoporous structure. The average size of pores was 10 nm, and the sizes of silicon nanocrystals (quantum dots) were 3–5 nm. Degradation of PSi NWs was observed as a significant decrease of optical absorbance, photoluminescence, and Raman signals of PSi NW suspensions after 24 h of incubation. Localization of PSi NWs at cell membranes revealed by confocal microscopy suggested that thermal poration of membranes could cause cell death. Thus, efficient photoluminescence in combination with RF-induced cell membrane breakdown indicates promising opportunities for theranostic applications of PSi NWs.
Keywords: radiofrequency; hyperthermia; biodegradation
DDC: 620
License: CC BY 4.0 Unported
Link to License: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
Appears in Collections:Ingenieurwissenschaften



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