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Title: Evolution of the Kondo lattice and non-Fermi liquid excitations in a heavy-fermion metal
Authors: Seiro, S.Jiao, L.Kirchner, S.Hartmann, S.Friedemann, S.Krellner, C.Geibel, C.Si, Q.Steglich, F.Wirth, S.
Publishers Version: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41467-018-05801-5
Issue Date: 2018
Published in: Nature Communications Vol. 9 (2018), No. 1
Publisher: London : Nature Publishing Group
Abstract: Strong electron correlations can give rise to extraordinary properties of metals with renormalized Landau quasiparticles. Near a quantum critical point, these quasiparticles can be destroyed and non-Fermi liquid behavior ensues. YbRh2Si2 is a prototypical correlated metal exhibiting the formation of quasiparticle and Kondo lattice coherence, as well as quasiparticle destruction at a field-induced quantum critical point. Here we show how, upon lowering the temperature, Kondo lattice coherence develops at zero field and finally gives way to non-Fermi liquid electronic excitations. By measuring the single-particle excitations through scanning tunneling spectroscopy, we find the Kondo lattice peak displays a non-trivial temperature dependence with a strong increase around 3.3 K. At 0.3 K and with applied magnetic field, the width of this peak is minimized in the quantum critical regime. Our results demonstrate that the lattice Kondo correlations have to be sufficiently developed before quantum criticality can set in.
Keywords: correlation; detection method; electron; heavy metal; magnetic field; temperature effect; article; excitation; fermion; magnetic field; scanning tunneling spectroscopy; temperature dependence
DDC: 530
License: CC BY 4.0 Unported
Link to License: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
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